OCFPL Summer Book Club

Date: Every week
Time: 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Join us for our first Summer Book Club!

We'll be discussing our favorite nonfiction books this summer.

We'll be meeting every Friday* at 9:30am, starting June 23rd, in Room 111. 

Hope to see you there!!

June 23rd: Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu

Describes how a group of Timbuktu librarians enacted a daring plan to smuggle the city’s great collection of rare Islamic manuscripts away from the threat of desctuction at the hands of Al Quaeda militants to the safety of southern Mali.

June 30th Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

Demonstrates how introverted people are misunderstood and undervalued in modern culture, charting the rise of extrovert ideology while sharing anecdotal examples of how to use introvert talents to adapt to various situations.

July 7th The Oracle: Ancient Delphi and the Science Behind Its Lost Secrets by William J. Broad

In 1892 French archaeologists unearthed the temple, but could find no evidence that the rocky ground had brought vapors of any kind. Science journalist Broad tells a modern-day detective story that blends history and science to describe how a team of scientists, working from subtle clues scattered throughout the ancient literature, as well as from the latest findings in geology, uncovered scientific evidence to explain the Oracle’s powers.

July 14th Sex Lives of Cannibals: Adrift in the Equatorial Pacific by J. Maarten Troost

At the age of twenty-six, Maarten Troost—who had been pushing the snooze button on the alarm clock of life by racking up useless graduate degrees and muddling through a series of temp jobs—decided to pack up his flip-flops and move to Tarawa, a remote South Pacific island in the Republic of Kiribati. He was restless and lacked direction, and the idea of dropping everything and moving to the ends of the earth was irresistibly romantic. He should have known better.

July 21st Eats, Shoots & Leaves by Lynne Truss

The spirited and scholarly #1 New York Times bestseller combines boisterous history with grammar how-to’s to show how important punctuation is in our world—period.

July 28th  Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly

Set against the backdrop of the Jim Crow South and the civil rights movement, the never-before-told true story of NASAs African-American female mathematicians who played a crucial role in Americas space programand whose contributions have been unheralded, until now. Moving from World War II through NASAs golden age, touching on the civil rights era, the Space Race, the Cold War, and the womens rights movement,Hidden Figures interweaves a rich history of scientific achievement and technological innovation with the intimate stories of five women whose work forever changed the worldand whose lives show how out of one of Americas most painful histories came one of its proudest moments.

August 4th The Square Meal: A Culinary History of the Great Depression by Jane Ziegelman

Jane Ziegelman, author of the acclaimed 97 Orchard, and her husband, Andrew Coe, team up for an in-depth exploration of America’s greatest food crisis.

August 11th The Lonely City by Olivia Laing

A dazzling work of biography, memoir, and cultural criticism on the subject of loneliness, told through the lives of iconic artists, by the acclaimed author of The Trip to Echo Spring.

August 18th Everybody Behaves Badly by Lesley Blume

In the summer of 1925, Ernest Hemingway traveled to Pamplona for the infamous running of the bulls. He then channeled that trip’s drunken brawls, sexual rivalry, midnight betrayals, and midday hangovers into a novel that redefined modern literature. Lesley Blume tells the full story behind Hemingway’s legendary rise for the first time, revealing how he created his own image as the bull-fighting aficionado, hard-drinking literary genius, and expatriate bon vivant. In all its youth, lust, and rivalry, the Lost Generation is illuminated here as never before.

August 25th The Lost City of Z by David Grann

In 1925, the legendary British explorer Percy Fawcett ventured into the Amazon jungle, in search of a fabled civilization. He never returned. Over the years countless perished trying to find evidence of his party and the place he called “The Lost City of Z.” In this masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, journalist David Grann interweaves the spellbinding stories of Fawcett’s quest for “Z” and his own journey into the deadly jungle, as he unravels the greatest exploration mystery of the twentieth century.

*Don't worry, you don't have to come to every discussion. :)

 

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